4 Ways Older Adults Who Can’t Drive Can Catch a Ride

Written By: Guest Contributor - May• 06•13
Misty Franklin (right), a driver with SilverRide, picks up client Agnes Dunn at her home in San Francisco. — Winni Wintermeyer

Misty Franklin (right), a driver with SilverRide, picks up client Agnes Dunn at her home in San Francisco. — Winni Wintermeyer

Source: AARP Bulletin

Need a ride?

More than 20 percent of Americans age 65 and older don’t drive, according to an analysis of the federal government’s National Household Travel Survey by AARP’s Public Policy Institute.

Soon, even more people will be clamoring for rides as the country’s 78 million boomers, now ages 49 to 67, shed their car keys. (And men typically outlive their driving days by seven years; women outlive theirs by 10.)

According to Transportation for America, an advocacy coalition, by 2015 more than 15.5 million Americans 65-plus will live in areas where public transportation service is poor or nonexistent.

Getting older nondrivers where they need to go could become a national conundrum.

Some communities and organizations are pursuing local solutions. For instance, the trailblazing nonprofit Independent Transportation Network, launched in Maine in 1995, transports people by using a combination of paid and volunteer drivers. Now serving 27 localities, it provided its 500,000th ride last December. Other nonprofits, for-profit companies and municipal and county agencies — often working together — are scrambling to fill the transportation demand.

To read about the four innovative initiatives around the country that are getting nondrivers where they need to be, click here to read the full AARP article.

 

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